Happy Canada Day…and Yay for the SCOTUS Ruling on the Affordable Care Act!

This is my fourth Canada Day post. But I’m posting a bit early because I meant to write a post over the weekend congratulating America on the Supreme Court of the United of the United States ruling on the Affordable Care Act last week, and haven’t got to it yet…and I figured that the two posts would fit well together, because all of my Canada Day posts have been about how Canada’s universal health care system is one of the reasons that I’m most proud to be Canadian.

Content Note: Healthcare, same-sex marriage

White maple leaf on a red background with "Happy Canada Day!" in red script across it. Keyword:

Image Description: White maple leaf on a red background with “Happy Canada Day!” in red script across it.

***

Long-time readers will know that I’ve been a clear supporter of the Affordable Care Act from the outset. I feel quite strongly that everyone should have access to good health care regardless of their ability to pay for it. Which is why I love the liberal judges on SCOTUS so much for squeaking this ruling through, because now it’s. Not. Going. Anywhere.

CNN said about the ruling:

“The ruling holds that the Affordable Care Act authorized federal tax credits for eligible Americans living not only in states with their own exchanges but also in the 34 states with federal marketplaces. It staved off a major political showdown and a mad scramble in states that would have needed to act to prevent millions from losing health care coverage.”

I realize that Canada’s system of universal health care looks less like what’s in place under the Affordable Care Act than it does the single payer system with which America toyed, but I think that any health care system with a mandate that as many people as possible should have access to medical care is one in which people can take pride.

Laws like the Affordable Care Act and Canadian Medicare move quality, high-cost medical treatment from the realm of the very privileged to that of people who can’t afford good insurance and certainly can’t afford to pay medical costs out of pocket.

Heck, I could barely have afforded the first ambulance ride to the first ER visit, let alone the ER visit itself, if I’d lived in a country without universal health care. Even with my family helping as much as they could, how could I have afforded the 14-hour brain surgery with one of the best AVM surgeons in North America, let alone the rehabilitation that came afterward?

Because I live in Canada, cost to me (and ultimately to my family, as I had next to no money when I discovered that I’d need brain surgery) wasn’t a factor in my decision to have my AVM treated, or in determining how long I could stay in inpatient rehabilitation after my stroke, or in deciding what kind of follow-up treatment was appropriate and when. That’s a tremendous gift to people who are facing a health crisis, and to their families, who already have so many things to worry about (and, for families who live in rural Canada, may already have to incur substantial costs associated with travel/lodging/food while dealing with loss of income). I’m proud that I live in country where people feel that providing this sort of care to citizens should be a priority, and proud to be neighbour to a country that is moving in the same direction. High five, America, and  Happy Canada Day to all!

Oh, there was another very important SCOTUS ruling last week definitely needs a mention. I was online when word came out that SCOTUS had made gay marriage just “marriage” in all 50 states, meaning that now people can marry who they like (there are still some restrictions on disabled people, but I’ll get into that another day), and the rainbows went over social media in a wave. It was really something to see.

Again, congratulations, America!

I’m proud to say that Canada has been doing this for 10 years.

You’ll love it! 🙂