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Tag Archives | vaccination

Jim Carrey Tweets Picture of Autistic Youth Without Permission During Anti-Vaccination Rant

cartoon of nurse giving a child a vaccinationCanadians, who tend to be at least supportive of Canadian actors just because they’re Canadian, have always been a bit divided about Jim Carrey. He’s one of those “love him or hate him” actors. I’ve enjoyed a few of his films. I’ve not enjoyed more of them. A few of them I haven’t bother to see, I’m that convinced that I’d hate them.

I don’t usually let an entertainment figure’s stance on an issue dictate whether I’ll see one of their films, with some exceptions. I had some serious issues with “The Passion of the Christ” and some of Mel Gibson’s public remarks, and now tend to avoid his work. I avoid some comedians because they use the R-word.

I knew that Jim Carrey’s stance on vaccinations being toxic is quite strong, but I don’t stop talking to people because they hold those views.  I didn’t see any need to boycott his films on that basis. And I still don’t.

But last week he took some the steps to get his anti-thimerosal/anti-mercury message out (Carrey insists that he’s not anti-vaccination, but against the addition of these substances in vaccinations) that crossed a line for me, and those steps have put me at “boycott” point.

Jim Carrey Uses Alex Echols’ Picture in Rant About California Vaccination Law

Upset by the law officially put into place in California last Tuesday that children must be vaccinated in order to attend school, Carey went on a 30-tweet rant about the chemicals in vaccinations, calling California governor Gerry Brown a “corporate facist” and using images of children in distress, implying that the thermosil in their vaccinations had caused the autism.

According to Salon, two pictures of crying boys that were tweeted were stock photos. But the third was of 14-year-old Alex Echols, and was definitely used without permission. Alex’s mother, Karen Echols was very upset, and tweeted to Jim:

“Please remove this photo of my son. You do not have permission to use his image.”

She explained later in an Instagram posting that Alex’s autism is caused by tuberous sclerosis and that he was showing signs of being autistic before he was vaccinated.

Jim Carrey removed the photo and apologized:

“I’d like to apologize to the Echols family and others for posting a pic of their kids w/o permission.I didn’t mean to cause them distress.”

I love a good non-apology.

Dehumanizing Autistic People

Cara (no last name given) nailed why Jim Carrey’s action were inappropriate in her blog post, An Open Letter to Jim Carrey. She talks about how Jim Carrey used pictures of children in distress, one that we can confirm is autistic, hoping that they’d scare people into seeing his point of view, and his hopes that people would say, “Oh my goodness, we don’t want our children to turn out like *that*, we’d better not vaccinate!” She talks about how static pictures are inherently dehumanizing, and how autistic people as a group don’t need anything more that dehumanizes them – in the last five years, 80 autistic children and adults have been dehumanized by their parents and caregivers to the point where they’ve been murdered.

Kudos, Cara, for beautifully expressing why Jim Carrey’s actions were so wrong.

Cara touches on the other form of dehumanization that went on.

Shame on You, Jim Carrey

The picture of Alex Echols that Jim Carrey used has been used in a couple of media pieces. Is it fair use? I’m not sure. I wouldn’t use it without permission for a number of reasons, the least of them being that I figure that it’s been posted in enough places by now that Alex doesn’t ever need to come across it in another. But even if it is fair use, Jim Carrey did not use it fairly. He co-opted it for his own cause, with no concern for whether Alex and his family would be okay with that, and in his apology he didn’t say that he was wrong. That he can claim to be so passionately concerned for child safety but exploit a disabled child in that way makes me angry, and very concerned that he didn’t have that insight into why what he did was wrong until someone called him on it.

It was another level of dehumanization: “I’m just going to pick you up and drop you in my cause and I don’t care what you think about it.” Shame on you, Jim Carrey.

Yes, shame on Jim Carrey, because he didn’t have to go further than Facebook to see that Alex is a growing, learning, person, deeply loved by his family and support staff.  Because they’re better people than I am, the Echols family is grateful for the awareness that this incident with Jim Carrey has brought to tuberous sclerosis and to the challenges that Alex faces every day.

And he could only manage a non-apology on Twitter.

You can learn more about Alex and his family here and here.

More About Tuberous Sclerosis and Autism

 

 

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Revisiting The Measles Vaccine Debate, in Light of Disneyland

measles vaccineApparently I need to blog about this measles vaccine business again.

It’s over a year since I talked about this, when there were small outbreaks in Canada and the US. The CDC reported 102 cases of measles at the end of January, most stemming from an outbreak at Disneyland in December.

No, it’s not a national emergency, although measles is “one of the leading cause of death in young children globally” (Read more here). The chances of a healthy person dying of measles in the US are fairly slim, as the majority of severe complications and deaths due to complications occur in developing countries with weak health infrastructure and children who are chronically malnourished. (Read more here). However, the chances are still a little too high for my liking: 1 or 2 infected children in 1000 will die, and up to 1 in 20 will experience measles-related complications. I know that a lot of people aren’t with me on this, but I consider measles a serious disease. Read more here.

I’m fully aware that many, many Americans got measles before the vaccine was routinely administered, as the disease is extremely contagious,  and survived it with minimal discomfort and downtime. Measles just used to be a part of life.

But it hasn’t been for a long time. The measles vaccine almost eradicated a disease that, for some that come in contact with it, is very dangerous. It can cause ear and chest infections, brain damage, deafness, blindness, pneumonia, and  encephalitis. Author Roald Dahl wrote about how his daughter Olivia died of measles encephalitis:

“Then one morning, when she was well on the road to recovery, I was sitting on her bed showing her how to fashion little animals out of coloured pipe-cleaners, and when it came to her turn to make one herself, I noticed that her fingers and her mind were not working together and she couldn’t do anything. ‘Are you feeling all right?’ I asked her. ‘I feel all sleepy,’ she said. In an hour, she was unconscious. In twelve hours she was dead.”

I know a mother whose son can’t have the measles vaccine because of a rare blood disorder, and she explained to me very carefully about how while the lack of a measles vaccine is always a concern, herd immunity protects people like her son. However, as fewer people vaccinate, herd immunity weakens, and puts even vaccinated people at risk, as the measles vaccination is only 95% effective.

Here’s a video about herd immunity, featuring some Gummi Bears…

Herd immunity is important, And this is why, blogging about the measles vaccine this time, I’m calling the crowd out that refuses to give it to their children.

The Decision Not to Give the Measles Vaccine Doesn’t Just Affect That Child

If a parent’s decision not to give a child the measles vaccine affected only that child, I’d be truly more than happy to let parents decide what they want. But that’s not the reality. A child who hasn’t had the measles vaccination is potentially dangerous to infants, the immunosuppressed, and other people who can’t have the measles vaccine for good reasons, including people undergoing cancer treatment…people who didn’t ask to be affected by the actions of those who refuse to to give their children the measles vaccine, and shouldn’t have to be. For people who refuse to vaccinate to insist that their right to go against the dictates of public health policy based on solid science should trump the rights of everyone else to to be in an environment that’s free of the potential to catch a disease with potentially serious health consequences is just selfish.

Yes, you parents who aren’t vaccinating your children against measles. You’re selfish. And if no one’s told you that yet, it’s about time that you heard it.

“But Autism”

I’ve read the reasons why parents aren’t choosing to get their children the measles vaccination. I’ve yet to hear a substantially-supported argument in favour of refusing to vaccinate, and this includes “Big pharma” and “toxins” and especially the “But autism” thing. In fact,  I’m flabbergasted at how often I’m hearing about people still refusing to vaccinate against measles because of the fear of their child getting autism.

In recent discussions on this, I’ve challenged on this ableist, “but autism” angle whenever I can, pointing out (as I did in my last blog post on this topic) that the studies that “linked” autism and vaccines were thoroughly debunked. I’ve pointed out that several times this week in discussions that making autism a “boogeyman” is a tactic of so-called “advocacy groups” with questionable ethics, such as “Autism Speaks”, and that many people autistic people would tell you that they’re perfectly fine with being autistic – it’s society that has the problem.

A friend did on Twitter said the other day, “As an autistic, the fact that so many people would rather have a child that’s dead than autistic child scares the shit out me.”

“Fucking Furious”

I didn’t realize until I read that, and started typing in response, “It makes me fucking furious, which is why I’m never going to stop fighting against this ableist ‘I’d vacccinate, but autism’ bullshit,” how angry about all this I really am (and I’m not autistic, so I can only imagine how autistic people must feel). Even if there was a remote chance that the measles vaccine could cause autism (which there isn’t), I’d rather take that remote chance, vaccinate, and know  that there was a 95% chance that my child would avoid the terribly contagious measles and anything more more serious that it might turn into.  I’m not a parent, but if I was, in this hypothetical world where vaccines once in a blue moon caused autism, I would without hesitation choose to do everything that I could to ensure my child stayed warm and alive in my arms, including vaccinate, rather than, God forbid, end up one of the few with a body that just cannot take the strain of fighting measles.

The Measles Vaccine – The Bottom Line

Forgive me if I cannot understand why a fear of autism prevents parents from giving children the measles vaccine, especially since it’s been proven that the two. Aren’t. Linked. Any children that I have will get the measles vaccine, to protect them and to protect others.

It’s as simple as that.

I’m sorry that I can’t be as diplomatic as I was last time. Discussions this past week have shown me that subtlety doesn’t get the point across with this particular issue.

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