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Tag Archives | Jon Stewart

The Zadroga Act: 9/11, Republicans, and Hypocrisy

New York Fire Department insignia (Zadroga Act)As I’m sure most, if not all, readers are aware, yesterday was the 14th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the United States. But do you know about the Zadroga Act?

I remember where I was when the planes hit the towers. I was living with my father in our family home at the time, not that far into stroke recovery and still trying to visualize what was going to come next in my life. I was in the kitchen, finishing up my breakfast, when I heard the news about the on the radio (always tuned to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in our house) about the plane hitting the first tower. I sat in shock for a moment, and then called Dad at his office and asked if he was listening to the radio. Did we know anyone that was supposed to be in New York today, that he knew of?

No, thank goodness.

When I heard the news about the second tower, I remembered the online mental health support community in which I’d been posting for a while. I quickly signed in, and found that there was already an “I’m okay” check-in going on from the New York area, and a call going to out to people who hadn’t checked in yet. By the next day, all of the regular posters in the New York area were accounted for, but some of them had lost friends and family.

In other words, I was not really affected.

I will always be proud of how Canada helped take care of diverted passengers. But I remember being very annoyed at the CBC radio reporter who, during the 6pm news report on September 11, tried to interview a New Yorker who was obviously severely traumatized and likely had no clue no what he was saying.

“Sure, ask him how he’s doing,” I grumbled at the time. “I’m sure he’s fabulous. I’m sure it’s been a *great* day for him. Way to report, CBC.”

And I remember the Jon Stewart segment from 2010 shaming a group of Republicans for filibustering the passage of the Zadroga Act in the Senate because I thought at the time, “Those fucking hypocrites.”

What’s the Zadroga Act?

You wouldn’t know from watching the CBS news last night. They talked about it, but didn’t mention it by name, as if the name of the Act that guarantees health care for the First Responders that develop one or more of the (in society as it’s constructed today) disabling conditions and illnesses including 50 forms of cancer that are linked to working in the toxins at Ground Zero doesn’t need a name. Or as if acknowledging the First Responders are still sick and dying after working at Ground Zero, fourteen years later, isn’t important.

This is a list of what the Zadroga Act covered in 2010: interstitial lung diseases, chronic respiratory disorder, WTC-exacerbated COPD, asthma, reactive airways dysfunction syndrome, chronic cough syndrome, upper airway hyperreactivity, chronic rhinosinusitis, chronic naropharyngitis, chronic laryngitis, GERD, sleep apnea, PTSD, major depressive disorder, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, anxiety disorder NOS, depression NOS, acute stress disorder, dysthymic disorder, substance abuse, adjustment disorder, some musculoskeletal disorders. More conditions have been added (including, as I said, over 50 cancers.)

“Call the Act by it’s name!” I yelled at the TV.

But What’s the Zadroga Act?

The Zadroga Act is named for James Zadroga, a First Responder who died in 2006 of respiratory disease frequently observed in 9/11 First Responders.  It was passed by the House of Representatives in September 2010, and the Democrats hoped to get it through the the Senate before the Christmas Break. However, in December 2010, Senate Republicans filibustered the passage of the Act, trying to get a tax break package through. There was a motion to break the filibuster and proceed, but it failed with just 3 votes short of the 60 needed (breakdown of the vote here, including who voted which way), despite the Zadroga Act having enough support to get through the Senate. The Democrats investigated a number of options, but couldn’t see any way that they could get the Zadroga Act through in the new year, with the Republicans set to take control of the House.

However, in the 11th hour of the 111th Congress, things turned around and the Zadroga Act was passed. The New York Post said:

“Certainly many supporters, including New York’s two senators, as well as Mayor Michael R.Bloomberg, played critical roles in turning around what looked like a hopeless situation after a filibuster by Republican senators on Dec. 10 seemed to derail the bill. But some of those who stand to benefit from the bill have no doubt about what — and who — turned the momentum around.”

Jon Stewart refused to comment, but he will stand again with sick First Responders next week when he protests in Washington for it reauthorization. Because when the Zadroga Bill was passed in 2010, it was only for 5 years, it needs to be reauthorized by the end of the month, and Congress hasn’t looked at it yet.

I couldn’t find the entire 2010 Jon Stewart segment in one piece. Here’s the early part of it, with him very annoyed.

And this is the more serious part, with the First Responders.

Here are the points that I really like:

  • Shame on the Republicans for being happy to be the party that “turned 9/11 into a catchphrase” while ignoring the responsibility that they have to the people who need help because of the work they did to help America deal with the 9/11 aftermath. Don’t talk about how grateful you are to “New York’s Finest” unless you’re prepared to back it up with your actions like providing them health care through legislation like the Zadroga Act.
  • News coverage. There was very little coverage of the struggle to get the Zadroga Act passed last time around, and if Jon Stewart hadn’t stepped in again, I doubt we’d have heard much about it this time around. Granted, I’ve not been watching much news, but that little piece on CBS tonight was the first I’d heard of it without Jon Stewart’s name attached to it.

The day after Stewart’s show in 2010, Fox’s Shepard Smith had this to say (trigger for vivid 9/11 imagery):

I think that pretty much says it all.

Visit Zadroga Claims Info  for more information about the Zadroga Act, and for an easy opportunity to email your Member of Congress expressing your support for extending it indefinitely.

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Why I’m Sad that Jon Stewart is Leaving “The Daily Show”

jon stewart

By Martin Monroe (http://flickr.com/photos/willismonroe/73332530/) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Jon Stewart in a disability advocacy blog?

Yes. And not just because he did a story about how silly it was that the Convention for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities wasn’t ratified in the US the first time around (“It’s official: Republicans hate the United Nations more than they like helping people in wheelchairs.”)  I remember it well, because I posted on my Facebook page: “Jon Stewart is doing a disability advocacy story. This man is awesome.” (The actual clip is here, but people outside the US may not be able to watch it. Sorry…clips from Comedy Network shows that everyone can see are hard to find these days.)

I’d already declared my admiration for Jon Stewart several times on Facebook, usually out of the blue and for no particular reason, so my friends weren’t really surprised. But even I’d been a bit surprised that an issue that got next to no coverage in the mainstream media had merited a coveted spot in Jon Stewart’s show, and I really was grateful to him.

After his announcement last Tuesday night that later on this year he’ll be handing over the reins to someone else, I found myself much sadder about it than I felt like I should have been. Until I read a Facebook comment on one of the many, many articles that I read later in the week about his impending departure that said (paraphrasing) that this was the only time that the writer had heard about a TV personality leaving a show where he’d walked around feeling sad for the entire next day. And I realized that it’s not just me that’s already dreading the day that Jon Stewart leaves The Daily Show.

Discovering Jon Stewart

I started watching The Daily Show when I moved out on my own after my stroke, in 2004. I’d just missed George Bush being elected by a couple of months. Between watching Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert, just in his sophomore year of his own show, a passing interest in American politics became a mild obsession. As the 2008 Election approached, I was dumbfounded. I’d never paid attention to this process before. For someone who was used to federal elections taking six weeks, from announcement to close of polls, it astonished me, and, frankly, sometimes disgusted me. I saw those emotions mirrored back at me every night from Jon Stewart behind his desk at The Daily Show.

Before I knew it, we were doing it again for 2012, and this time I felt knowledgeable enough (and passionate enough) to write about here. The Daily Show was no longer my only source of American news. I watched CNN in the mornings, commiserating with people over Twitter about how terrible…how absolutely terrible…the morning show format was. Unable to get MSNBC or Fox with my cable package, I listened carefully to what people said about them, watched clips, talked to people, formed opinions. I started to realize that I already knew about events that Jon Stewart talked about on the show, feeling a bit guilty that between my consumption of British news to keep up with what was going on with welfare benefit reform, and of American news simply because I was fascinated by it, I knew more more about what was going on in two other countries than I did my own. I try to balance that out now by catching the Canadian news at 6 pm.

What Jon Stewart and “The Daily Show” Mean to Me

Rolling Stone Magazine put Jon Stewart’s power over bleeding heart liberals like me nicely in this article:

“…his famous request to Tucker Carlson and Paul Begala of Crossfire — “Stop hurting America” — was a not-so-quiet refrain under everything the host did.”

That “Crossfire” appearance is widely credited to be one of Jon Stewart’s finest moments on television (and the moment that caused the cancellation of the show several months later).  Paul Begala had this to say about it when he heard about Jon Stewart’s announcement last Tuesday.

Watch the “Crossfire” interview in question (where Jon Stewart does indeed call Tucker Carlson, now on Fox, a “dick”…I hadn’t caught that until I read Paul Begala’s comments):

But the real reason I’ll miss Jon Stewart? I’m a TV person, as much as I don’t want to be. I live alone. I keep the TV on for noise when I’m doing other things, and when I’m feeling sad/lonely/overwhelmed/anxious, I watch for distraction. Once I moved out on my own, I wasn’t sure I’d ever find a job, but I did. I was a supply Educational Assistant – I was told that because of my disabilities, I wouldn’t be called very often. I got another job. I spent 5 years helping some very brave disabled young people and their families some hard battles that took a lot out of all of us, lost the job because there wasn’t any other work that I could do in the company with my disabilities when my position was cut, and couldn’t find another job for over a year. The sitcoms to which I went for laughs and distraction came and went.

But most weren’t very funny. Jon Stewart and The Daily Show consistently g0t a laugh – sometimes the first laugh in an otherwise dismal day – from me. When the day’s been long and you’re wondering how you’re going to get through the next one, that’s a lot, right there. Jon Stewart gave me a laugh, spoke right to my despairing liberal heart, and made me feel like, somehow, it was going to be okay.

I’ll miss that.

But I understand that no one can do the same job forever.

So, best of luck, Jon Stewart. And thank you to readers for letting me meander a bit…

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