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Tag Archives | AVM

Happy Canada Day…and Yay for the SCOTUS Ruling on the Affordable Care Act!

Depositphotos_11322456_xsThis is my fourth Canada Day post. But I’m posting a bit early because I meant to write a post over the weekend congratulating America on the Supreme Court of the United of the United States ruling on the Affordable Care Act last week, and haven’t got to it yet…and I figured that the two posts would fit well together, because all of my Canada Day posts have been about how Canada’s universal health care system is one of the reasons that I’m most proud to be Canadian.

Long-time readers will know that I’ve been a clear supporter of the Affordable Care Act from the outset. I feel quite strongly that everyone should have access to good health care regardless of their ability to pay for it. Which is why I love the liberal judges on SCOTUS so much for squeaking this ruling through, because now it’s. Not. Going. Anywhere.

From CNN:

“The ruling holds that the Affordable Care Act authorized federal tax credits for eligible Americans living not only in states with their own exchanges but also in the 34 states with federal marketplaces. It staved off a major political showdown and a mad scramble in states that would have needed to act to prevent millions from losing health care coverage.”

I realize that Canada’s system of universal health care looks less like what’s in place under the Affordable Care Act than it does the single payer system with which America toyed, but I think that any health care system with a mandate that as many people as possible should have access to medical care is one in which people can take pride.

Laws like the Affordable Care Act and Canadian Medicare move quality, high-cost medical treatment from the realm of the very privileged to that of people who can’t afford good insurance and certainly can’t afford to pay medical costs out of pocket.

Heck, I could barely have afforded the first ambulance ride to the first ER visit, let alone the ER visit itself, if I’d lived in a country without universal health care. Even with my family helping as much as they could, how could I have afforded the 14-hour brain surgery with one of the best AVM surgeons in North America, let alone the rehabilitation that came afterward?

Because I live in Canada, cost to me (and ultimately to my family, as I had next to no money when I discovered that I’d need brain surgery) wasn’t a factor in my decision to have my AVM treated, or in determining how long I could stay in inpatient rehabilitation after my stroke, or in deciding what kind of follow-up treatment was appropriate and when. That’s a tremendous gift to people who are facing a health crisis, and to their families, who already have so many things to worry about (and, for families who live in rural Canada, may already have to incur substantial costs associated with travel/lodging/food while dealing with loss of income). I’m proud that I live in country where people feel that providing this sort of care to citizens should be a priority, and proud to be neighbour to a country that is moving in the same direction. High five, America, and  Happy Canada Day to all!

Oh, there was another very important SCOTUS ruling last week definitely needs a mention. I was online when word came out that SCOTUS had made gay marriage just “marriage” in all 50 states, meaning that now people can marry who they like (there are still some restrictions on disabled people, but I’ll get into that another day), and the rainbows went over social media in a wave. It was really something to see.

Again, congratulations, America!

I’m proud to say that Canada has been doing this for 10 years.

You’ll love it! 🙂

 

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My AVM Story: Working “Out There”, Working on Balance

Grey silhouetted hand. From index finger and thumb dangle a scale with "Life" in purple capital letters on one plate and "Work" in blue capital letters on the otherIt took a couple of years after my brain surgery and stroke, but eventually I was well enough to work.

It’s always been part-time. Work in the educational and developmental services sector is always part-time and contract when you’re just breaking into it these days, and in the area in which I live, work in general is usually part-time and/or seasonal. Most people work a couple of jobs to make ends meet.

Until recently, it’s been rare for me to find more than one job at a time that I can actually do, given my disabilities and the restrictions that they impose on me, although with freelancing there have certainly been times where I’ve worked the equivalent of full-time. But a writing job in my apartment and a desk job “out there” don’t necessarily require the same amount of energy from me, as I’ve recently discovered.

Since September, I’ve been working at a local computer centre, created especially for people who want to do online learning. It’s part of a government program, and a good one. There’s a small fine arts community college in my community, but anyone who’s wanted to pursue post-secondary education in just about anything else has had to take the big, expensive step of moving to a larger centre and attending school there, or commuting at least 2.5 hours round trip per day. With the increasing number of programs offered totally or almost totally online at Canadian universities and community colleges, the Contact North program allows people in rural communities like mine to get assistance choosing a program, get signed up, and to have a place with fast internet access to do their work if they need it.

Most weeks it’s not a whole lot of hours. But some weeks it has has been. And recently there’s been the welcome addition of a writing/research job with a small media production company in my town, for two or three days a week. I some of that work from home, but I like going into the office at least one day a week. My last two jobs haven’t been office jobs. I miss that environment.

I come home at night and catch up on with my freelancing, and often fall asleep at the computer as I’m working. I do a lot of catch-up on weekends.

I hear people who have had strokes talk about how they’re much more tired than they were before, and I remember when that was really the case for me. But now I tend to think, “That’s not me anymore” and I push myself pretty hard sometimes when, really, I don’t know how much of my brain is still damaged, and to what extent, and how it affects me.

I can see the effects of some of it, of course. But I don’t know if even my doctors can say for sure  what all of the effects of the stroke were.

Everyone has to find a way to balance work and other aspects of life, and to figure out how to stay healthy and to schedule time for everything that they want and need to do. I’m grateful to be able to work and to have a lot of work right now, but I’m sorry that it’s not leaving me a lot of time and energy to write. I’m working on that. I’d like to be here more.

I’ve never been very good at the life balance thing. I’m trying to learn!

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