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Disabled Parking Permits and the Dangers of Assumptions

Disabled parking tag with note that says "Faker" attached to itThis post is going to be preaching to the choir for most of the people who read this blog. Maybe you can pass the link along to someone who insists on making assumptions about people who park a vehicle with the disabled parking permit visible in the window, in a disabled parking spot.

My thoughts on this are spurred by a post that I shared on the Facebook page, by a woman with who parked in a disabled parking spot, using the disabled parking permit that had been issued to her, and came back to find a note attached to it that said “FAKER”.

A Brief Lesson About Disabled Parking Permits

In case anyone’s unclear on this, let’s go through when you can’t park in a disabled parking spot (Ontario Regulations):

When you don’t have a disabled parking permit displayed, and you’re going to be in the store for “just 5 minutes”

When you do have a permit displayed, and you’re going to be in the store for any amount of time and the person to whom the disabled parking permit was issued is not in the car.

When you do have a disabled parking permit, you’re going to be in the store for any amount of time, the person to whom the disabled parking permit was issued *is* in the car, but won’t be going into the store. If the disabled person is just going to sit in the car in the disabled parking spot, they’re taking up the spot and pushing out a disabled person that might actually intend to go into the store. It’s a misuse of the permit.

Here’s when you can park in a disabled parking spot: You are the disabled person to whom the permit was issued, or the person to whom the permit was issued is in the vehicle, and will be going into the store.

The Disabled Parking Permit and Assumptions

Abuse of the disabled parking permit is definitely annoying. When I see a car parked in a disabled parking spot, I check to see if there’s a permit displayed on the dashboard. But what’s even more annoying is when people:

  1. Make the assumption that a person who doesn’t “look disabled” enough to have a disabled parking permit assume that a person isn’t entitled to it and must be scamming the system.
  2. Take it upon themselves to police people who they assume aren’t “disabled” enough to have a disabled parking permit.

I don’t think that the average person understands that for many, many disabled people, a day where they walk around town doing errands or having lunch and an afternoon out with friends means three or four days of recovery where they have to use a wheelchair. Even after a decade of being able to walk without a cane inside, and even outside for short distances depending on the season and weather, a day of walking without my cane at the Toronto Zoo left me so exhausted that I was stunned.

It’d be easy to assume, catching a disabled person after a few days of rest and recovery, that perhaps the disabled permit on the dashboard isn’t necessary. Someone might assume that the person gets around that easily all the time, and become suspicious: How is that person disabled? Did he or she scam the system? The trouble with that assumption is that it doesn’t take into account that perhaps that person is so exhausted and in so much pain that the parking permit is vital.

The other trouble with that assumption is the second one that often flows from it, that having identified disability parking permit “fraud”, it’s okay for citizens to deal with it themselves.

Disabled Parking Permit “Fraud”: Citizens Policing Citizens

I don’t understand is how it’s anyone’s business, outside of the office that issues the disabled parking permit, whether a person is “deserving” of a permit or not. The assumption that I’d rather make is that the permit is on the car, someone thought they should have it, whether it looks to me at the moment like they should or not –

And it’s not my job to police people!

It’s not Joe Public’s job, either. It’s none of his business. And I’d really like to know where people got the idea that it was. The idea that disabled people should be required to prove to just anyone on the street on  demand whether they’re “disabled enough” to receive a service is particularly insidious ableism, and a real measuring stick of how far we *haven’t* come. When your typical person on the street still feels entitled to that sort of power over disabled people, that’s a real concern.

I remember writing something like that before, so I went back over my posts for the past year. I found what I was looking for in a post about Kanye West. He refused to continue singing unless everyone was standing up at a concert, and when some people in wheelchairs didn’t stand up (because they couldn’t) he sent staff to make sure that they couldn’t. I wrote:

“There are very few people to whom I have to prove that I’m disabled. They are service providers that need proof of disability so that I can start/keep receiving some sort of service. I’m not crazy about this, but it’s part of life, it’s fairly infrequent, and I deal with it. I do not have to prove that I’m disabled to a person on the street, another disabled person, or anyone else that I don’t want to.”

You don’t have to either. Spread the word.

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